A New Way of Thinking About “Church”

By Lorman Lykes

“All things reach perfection after passing through the growing period (the realm of indirect dominion) by virtue of the autonomy and governance given by God’s Principle. Human beings, however, are created in such a way that their growth requires the fulfillment of their own portion of responsibility, in addition to the guidance provided by the Principle.” (Chapter 1, Exposition of the Divine Principle)

Have you ever wondered how long it would take before you uttered the words, “I’m perfect?”

The quotation above succinctly explains the process of reaching the top of the completion stage, which in Unification terminology means reaching perfection as a child of Heavenly Parent.

I would venture that many Unificationists have dismissed the notion of personal perfection at best as far-off in the future and even as an unobtainable.  How can Unificationists bridge the gap between the reality and the elusiveness of this lofty ambition?

In attempting to answer this question we must acknowledge that perfection is an ambiguous concept to define. Even though it is at the center of Divine Principle’s understanding of spiritual growth, it carries with it the ethos of Christian theology and secular psychology.

For Unificationists, a reasonable length of time has passed in which a consensus of agreement should have occurred to define clearly and conclusively the meaning, scope and parameters of the presumed goal of our physical life on earth.

What’s more, with a clear definition and understanding of perfection, it would provide for the individuals who exemplify a model of perfection an opportunity to pave the way for others to follow, encouraging them that it is possible.

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