After 60 Years, Peace Treaty Needed to End Korean War

Representatives_of_North_and_South_Korea_meet_in_the_village_of_Panmunjom_A1501-SCN-97-0078-001

U.S. military officers face-off against North Korean officers at the truce village of Panmunjom

By Mark P. Barry, Lecturer in Management, UTS

“The Korean peninsula was divided into north and south, not because our people wanted it, but because of the influence of the surrounding powerful nations….We have to transform the existing situation, where the United States, the Soviet Union, China, and Japan play a leading role in the international order as they keep our nation divided….[W]e should develop the proactive influence of our people and of Korea so the neighboring superpowers can cooperate in the reunification of the Korean peninsula instead of obstructing it.”

— Sun Myung Moon, Cheon Seong Gyeong, 231-8, 1992.5.11

Mark Barry Photo 2While Korea is the fatherland of our faith, Unificationists should remember that the peninsula continues to live under an uneasy truce signed 60 years ago this year. It’s also easy to forget that for 35 (in effect 40) years, it lived under oppressive Japanese colonialism, and that from 1895, two wars (Sino-Japanese and Russo-Japanese) were largely fought over it. We overlook that Korea has experienced 118 years of turbulence, captivity, division, and conflict.

With the 24-hour news cycle, Americans understandably fixate on North Korea’s latest threats, but the underlying cause of the problem of North Korea is the absence of a peace treaty following the 1953 Armistice that halted the Korean War.

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